condenasttraveler:

The city of Sitka, Alaska, can be reached only by ferry or airplane.

I’ve visited Sitka once, and I’ll go to Sitka again, for the zombie apocalypse.

condenasttraveler:

The city of Sitka, Alaska, can be reached only by ferry or airplane.

I’ve visited Sitka once, and I’ll go to Sitka again, for the zombie apocalypse.

60 Things You Probably Didn't Know About New York City

Some of my favorite factoids about New York City from BuzzFeed:

  • The first pizzeria in the United States was opened in NYC in 1895.
  • Up until World War II, everyone in the entire city who was moving apartments had to move on May 1.
  • There’s a man who mines sidewalk cracks for gold. He can make over $600 a week.
  • Up until 1957, there was a pneumatic mail tube system that was used to connect 23 post offices across 27 miles. At one point, it moved 97,000 letters a day.
  • Albert Einstein’s eyeballs are stored in a safe deposit box in the city.
  • New York City has more people than 39 of the 50 states in the U.S.
  • New York City has the largest Chinese population of any city outside of Asia.
  • In nine years, Madison Square Garden’s lease will run out and it will have to move.
  • There are more undergrad and graduate students in NYC than Boston has people.
  • NYC garbage collectors call maggots “disco rice.”
  • There’s a 150-foot-deep hole (15 stories) on Park Avenue between 36th and 37th streets.
  • The scary nitrogen gas tanks you see on the corners of streets are used to keep underground telephone wires dry.

Our memories cling to us like our skin clings to our flesh. But in time, we shed them and they become the stuff of dust.

"Specialty Chicken" by Domino’s Pizza.
The worlds of pizza and fried chicken collides, as Domino’s Pizza has replaced the the pizza dough with boneless, breaded chunks of chicken breasts. Basically, it’s a raft of popcorn chicken tenuously held together by a salty, greasy glue of cheese and sauce with toppings, going over the waterfall of your saliva-filled mouth-hole straight down into your churning stomach. Available nationwide at $5.99, this deliciously disgusting / disgustingly delicious Frankenstein fast food comes in four flavors:
Classic Hot Buffalo
Sweet BBQ Bacon
Spicy Jalapeno-Pineapple
Crispy Bacon & Tomato
Just looking at the picture makes my mouth water and my stomach sag. Depending on your local Domino’s store, it might actually be really good or really gross. I’m glad I’m back on eating pescetarian so this isn’t a temptation. Because I’d be definitely tempted…

"Specialty Chicken" by Domino’s Pizza.

The worlds of pizza and fried chicken collides, as Domino’s Pizza has replaced the the pizza dough with boneless, breaded chunks of chicken breasts. Basically, it’s a raft of popcorn chicken tenuously held together by a salty, greasy glue of cheese and sauce with toppings, going over the waterfall of your saliva-filled mouth-hole straight down into your churning stomach. Available nationwide at $5.99, this deliciously disgusting / disgustingly delicious Frankenstein fast food comes in four flavors:

  • Classic Hot Buffalo
  • Sweet BBQ Bacon
  • Spicy Jalapeno-Pineapple
  • Crispy Bacon & Tomato

Just looking at the picture makes my mouth water and my stomach sag. Depending on your local Domino’s store, it might actually be really good or really gross. I’m glad I’m back on eating pescetarian so this isn’t a temptation. Because I’d be definitely tempted…

Game of Thrones Opening Theme
Composed by: Ramin Djawadi
Piano Arrangement by: Mark Fowler

To download the sheet music for this arrangement, click here.

This is the piano arrangement to the theme song that plays during the opening credits of Game of Thrones, HBO’s wildly popular, epic, and bloody TV series based on George R. R. Martin’s fantasy novels. The song is composed by Ramin Djawadi. Djawadi is an Iranian-German composer of orchestral music for film and TV, whose other works include music for Iron ManPacific RimBatman Begins, and Prison Break.

This particular sheet music arrangement for the solo piano is by Mark Fowler. This is the arrangement that seems to be floating around on the internet and played by other people on YouTube. You can visit Mark Fowler’s website, where you can find piano arrangements to other popular TV shows, movies, songs, and even video games. You can also check out his music on Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube.

Click here to download the sheet music in PDF.

Is This The Lowest A Top U.S. Law Firm Has Ever Stooped?

Either as a favor to a large client or to expand their presence in Japan, the corporate law firm Mayer Brown is representing a deceptively-named organization called the Global Alliance for “Historical Truth”—US (quotation marks added) in a lawsuit that claims a memorial in Glendale, California honoring Korean and other Asian "comfort women" (a.k.a. victims of sexual slavery forced to satisfy Japanese Nazi-allies on the front lines of World War II) will cause Japanese-Americans to suffer “irreparable injury” from “feelings of exclusion, discomfort, and anger”.

Don’t you mean, the memorial will cause nationalistic Japanese historical revisionists and war atrocity deniers “irreparable cognitive dissonance” from “feelings of guilt, shame, and self-loathing”? If you’re interested in strongly voicing your complaints and objections, the full names of some people behind the lawsuit are printed in the Forbes article by global economics writer Eamonn Fingleton. If you use Chinese, Korean, or Filipino social media, you should translate the article and share it there to “help” Mayer Brown expand their presence in the rest of Asia.

I’m sure corporate law firms have stooped to much lower for the right of money and when the issue is complex enough as to confuse or bore the public rather than evoke a backlash, but Mayer Brown’s role in this lawsuit seems so readily reprehensible in its intersection of petty spite with World War II and sexual slavery.

On a related note, just as Japanese historical revisionists are behind the “Global Alliance for Historical Truth” that denies the suffering of women forced into the harsh conditions of wartime prostitution, the Japanese whaling industry are behind the “Institute of Cetacean Research” that disguises the commercial hunting, impaling, butchering of whales as “scientific research”. They’re sure pretty slick with their branding.

Red flower buds are starting to emerge on this birch tree along the west side of Lake Wanoksink, Harriman State Park.

Red flower buds are starting to emerge on this birch tree along the west side of Lake Wanoksink, Harriman State Park.

prostheticknowledge:

BionicKangaroo

Robotic recreation of the Kangaroo form put together by Festo to demonstrate energy-efficient movement (this was initially announced on April the 1st, but turns out to be real) - video embedded below:

With the BionicKangaroo, Festo has technologically reproduced the unique way a kangaroo moves. Like its natural model, it can recover the energy when jumping, store it and efficiently use it for the next jump.

On the artificial kangaroo, Festo intelligently combines pneumatic and electrical drive technology to produce a highly dynamic system. The stable jump kinematics plus the precise control technology ensure stability when jumping and landing. The consistent lightweight construction facilitates the unique jumping behaviour. The system is controlled by gestures.

More Here

(via radmax)

fastcompany:

Look At The World’s Greatest Skylines Without Any Lights On

In Darkened Cities, the lights from these famous metropolises have been removed, giving you a glimpse at what a city would look like without the power of electricity.

More> Co.Exist

  1. New York City
  2. Los Angeles
  3. New York City
  4. Hong Kong
  5. Hong Kong
  6. Los Angeles
  7. Paris
  8. Paris
  9. Paris
  10. Rio de Janeiro

The full text of "Look At The World’s Greatest Skylines Without Any Lights On" by Patrick James of Fast Company's Co.Exist:

When we envision the world’s greatest cities—from San Francisco to Sao Paulo to Paris to Tokyo—we usually picture bridges and towers and cathedrals: the built environments that have left lasting impressions on our mind’s eyes. The irony being that those skylines have been in place for at most a century or two; the sky above has looked the same for millions of years.

Our greatest cities are often the sources of the most light pollution. In those places, we rarely see the stars. But, with a clever method of composite imaging, the French photographer Thierry Cohen has turned the lights out in the city to reveal the stunning stars that have always been overhead.

In his series "Darkened Cities," Cohen creates a visual reminder of what the world would look like if it were free of light pollution, and asks us to ponder how an increasingly urban society can disconnect us from the natural world. So how does he create the images? New York’s Danziger Gallery, which will feature his work beginning on March 28, explains:

Cohen’s method is original and precise and harkens back to the methodologies employed by early 19th century photographers like Gustave Le Grey. He photographs the world’s major cities, seeking out views that resonate for him and noting the precise time, angle, and latitude and longitude of his exposure. As the world rotates around its axis the stars that would have been visible above a particular city move to deserts, plains, and other places free of light pollution. By noting the precise latitude and angle of his cityscape, Cohen is able to track the earth’s rotation to places of atmospheric clarity like the Mojave, the Sahara, and the Atacama desert. There he sets up his camera to record what is lost to modern urban dwellers.

By linking those two images, Cohen connects contemporary landscapes to the geometry of the stars (each image title includes corresponding longitudinal and latitudinal coordinates). In doing so, he not only juxtaposes the density of our tiny, crowded cities with the vastness of the universe, but also suggests that all our lights will one day fade. While we’re here, we owe it to ourselves to consider what’s been here all along.