wolverxne:

Svartifoss, Iceland | by: { Tim James }

The hexagonal rocks formation are actually slowly-cooled lava columns. This is going on my travel bucket list.

wolverxne:

Svartifoss, Iceland | by: { Tim James }

The hexagonal rocks formation are actually slowly-cooled lava columns. This is going on my travel bucket list.

(Source: WOLVERXNE)

How police treated a dangerous “open carry” zealot

kohenari:

This piece at Salon makes very clear a point I’ve made before: White men with guns are patriotic activists who should be afforded every courtest as they exercise their rights while black men with guns are dangerous thugs who should be apprehended or simply shot on sight:

Here’s an actual example — an example of good policing — that you should contrast with the example of John Crawford’s shooting by police in an Ohio Wal*Mart:

Here’s what happened. It was a Sunday afternoon about 4 p.m. when Kalamazoo 9-1-1 got several calls from citizens concerned about an intoxicated man with a gun walking around a coin laundry and “stumbling around a little bit and kind of bumping into some stuff” on the street. The police arrived shortly and confronted the man by saying, “Hey, partner, how you doing? Can you set that down real quick and talk to me?” (The officer didn’t have his gun drawn.) The armed man refused to set it down. The officer told him that he was jaywalking and was being detained. At that point the officer radioed that the armed man would not drop the weapon. He tells the man again that he just wants to talk to him and says, “You’re walking around here scaring people, man.”

A second police car arrives at the scene. The man refuses to identify himself and demands to know if he’s free to go and the officer says no, that he is resisting and obstructing, a misdemeanor, for jaywalking and failing to identify himself. The man says, “Why don’t you fucking shoot me?” The officer gently replies, “I don’t want to shoot you; I’m not here to do that.”

This back and forth continues, with the man refusing to give up his gun and the cops patiently trying to talk him down from his position. The whole time he’s rambling about revolution and accusing the cops of being “gang members.” It becomes clear that he has conceived this drunken episode as an “open carry” demonstration. He’s proving to the community how important it is that “good guys” be allowed to carry guns on the street to protect themselves.

Soon 12 police are on the scene, including a supervisor and SWAT negotiator. The street is shut down in both directions. Police recordings describe the man as agitated and hostile and although he is holding his gun at “parade rest” he’s switching it back and forth and fumbling in his pockets for chewing tobacco. After much discussion, he finally agrees to give up the weapon.

Do the police then instantly swarm him and wrestle him to the ground? Do they handcuff him, throw him in the back of the police car and arrest him for the trouble he’s caused? Did he get roughed up or put in a chokehold for resisting arrest and being uncooperative?

None of that happened to this man. The police took his gun and then said he could have it back immediately if he agreed to take a breathalyzer test on the spot. (You can be arrested for carrying a firearm while intoxicated in Michigan if you blow a .08 or above, the same legal limit for DUI.) The man refused. They carried on for a while longer with the man objecting to having his gun taken away even as the police explain that he is free to walk home and retrieve it at the police station the next day. They spar over whether he’s mentally unstable and if it’s a good idea for him to “demonstrate” this way, particularly being hostile to the police. He finally apologizes and leaves the scene without his gun. No charges were filed. Nobody was hurt. He got his gun back.

Reminder: If you’re white, you can carry a gun around town and drunkenly shout at police officers, even encourage them to shoot you. If you’re not white, and even if you’re unarmed, you might be shot to death by police because someone is suspicious of you, because you’re suspected of a minor crime, or just because you were rude to a police officer.

tastefullyoffensive:

[bluechaircomics/via webtoons]

(via loveislikeafart)

I don’t care if they’re walking along an avenue or street, there should be a special place in Hell for people in New York who walk four abreast.

I’m not sure if they belong one circle of Hell above or below the people who loiter in a one-block radius around the Empire State Building, asking tourists if they’re “going up?”

Also, those fake "Buddhist monks" who scam people into donating money to their “temple” back in Taiwan deserve to be reincarnated as chickenfeed.

Siracusa, Sicily

Walter is a Labrador who loves the ocean. Happy Friday night and have a great weekend, y’all!

bobbycaputo:

When Skydivers Meet |  Dom Daher 
Soul Flyers Fred Fugen and Vincent Reffet perform during training in Austria for The Ultimate Skydiving Combo, skydiving from 33,000 feet (10 km) above Austria on May 13th, 2014. (Via.)

This image is magical in so many different ways.

bobbycaputo:

When Skydivers Meet |  Dom Daher 

Soul Flyers Fred Fugen and Vincent Reffet perform during training in Austria for The Ultimate Skydiving Combo, skydiving from 33,000 feet (10 km) above Austria on May 13th, 2014. (Via.)

This image is magical in so many different ways.

(via fastcompany)

afternoonsnoozebutton:

the end tho

Is this by the same College Humor that I never visit anymore because they were great for killing time during college but their content just isn’t that funny? Because this is surprisingly awesome.

(Source: jonsnowflakes, via loveislikeafart)

youaintpunk:

sarajevomoja:

talk about perspective. shit.

Fucking hell.

youaintpunk:

sarajevomoja:

talk about perspective. shit.

Fucking hell.

(via loveislikeafart)

parkingstrange:

(Source: sandandglass, via loveislikeafart)

By [2012], Chinese hospitals were reporting an average of twenty-seven attacks a year, per hospital.

"Under the Knife" by Christopher Beam. August 25, 2014 issue of The New Yorker.

Here’s another choice quote about Chinese society:

"For much of his career, [Wei Liangyue] has specialized in human-rights law. He has suffered as a result. At the time of the trial, Wei had only recently returned from a reëducation camp… In 2009, he and his wife were detained for a month by police from Harbin’s public-security bureau…"